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Hello

I'm not sure which would be the best option for our company.

 

We have 40-45 users, who use Microsoft Exchange and around 20 users who use
a SharePoint Team Site.

 

We would like to move all of our services to office 365 but have seamless integration
with our PC's and our passwords for our local domain sync with our office 365
domain without affecting fault tolerance (i.e. if our local internet connection
goes down, will remote office 365 users be able to logon) or reliability of the
system.

I understand there are a few different methods or things that need to be
deployed but I’m not sure which is needed in our case.

 

Any help would be very much appreciated.

Verified Answer
  • Hi Francis,

     

    Thank you for your post.

     

    As your requirement, you can consider to deploy the Single Sign-On. For more detailed information, please refer the link below:

    Single sign-on roadmap

     

    After deploy the SSO, when user login Office 365 service, it will be redirected to your local AD to authentication, however, if your local Internet connection goes down, the user can not be authenticated, so that they can not log in Office 365 either.

     

    If there are any questions, please feel free to post.

     

    Thanks,
    Jolin Qiao

All Replies
  • I don't know what this means: "our local domain sync with our office 365

    domain without affecting fault tolerance " but as long as you can access the internet you can access 365 services.

    You need 40-45 E licenses split between E2 or E3 (SP+Exchange) and Exchange Plan 1 (or2). (email only). You might want to look at kiosk licenses too for the email only users.

  • Hi Francis,

     

    Thank you for your post.

     

    As your requirement, you can consider to deploy the Single Sign-On. For more detailed information, please refer the link below:

    Single sign-on roadmap

     

    After deploy the SSO, when user login Office 365 service, it will be redirected to your local AD to authentication, however, if your local Internet connection goes down, the user can not be authenticated, so that they can not log in Office 365 either.

     

    If there are any questions, please feel free to post.

     

    Thanks,
    Jolin Qiao

  • Hi Jolin

    Thanks for getting back to me, is it possible to federate two Read Write Domain Controllers, so that if our "Main Office" Internet is down, ADFS can connect to a Read Write Domain Controller at a Branch office.

    Our drive behind office 365 is to move to a fault tolerant system without affecting the end users experience.

    Thanks again for your time.  

  • Hi Francis,

     

    Did your Main Office and Branch Office use the same Internet network environment or different? Can you elaborate more detailed about your current cooperation environment?

     

    Generally, as long as your ADFS server can be connected from Internet and the ADFS can connect to your Local AD, then the Office 365 end user can be authenticated to use Online services. However, in order to provide fault tolerance, load-balancing, and scalability to your organization's AD FS 2.0 production environment, we recommend that you deploy at least two federation servers.

     

    For more detailed information, please refer the links below:

    http://onlinehelp.microsoft.com/en-us/office365-enterprises/ff652539.aspx

     

    Thanks,
    Jolin Qiao

  • Hi Francis,

    How are things going?

    If there are any questions, please feel free to post.

    Thanks,

    Jolin Qiao